Text Talk - Infographic

From OMG to LOL, there’s no denying that texting has changed the way we communicate with each other. Look no further than the fact that you don’t need clarification of what OMG or LOL means as proof that our written communication is evolving.

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Though acronyms aren’t a new part of our language (the military has used them for years), the way we are using them in daily conversation with each other is a relatively new phenomenon. It’s safe to say that a new language has been born: text talk. This language is so widely used that it’s now infiltrating everyday life. The acronyms common in SMS texting are used via mobile devices and on Facebook and social media sites in order to disseminate an idea in an abbreviated form. Many “words” in this abbreviated language have even made it into the formidable Oxford English Dictionary. It makes perfect sense that a text language would have evolved. After all, who wants to type “You made me laugh just now with your witty comment” on a tiny keyboard when “LOL” or even “ROTFLOL” gets the point across just as well…if not even better.

Now that text talk is widely accepted as a legitimate form of communication, we are left wondering: Will text talk become our main form of communication in the future? Will the widespread use of text talk negatively impact the way we communicate? Or are we engaged in the creation of a colorful new language every time we text?

Sources:

Americans and Text Messaging, Pew Internet & American Life Project , September 2011
New Pew Research: Teenagers Love Texting Not Talking on the Phone, Digital Journal, March 2012
OMG! LOL: Internet Slang Added to Oxford English Dictionary, PC World, March 2011

For a complete list of sources, please view the Infographic.

 

Text Talk
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